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Herbal Vinegars & Oils
1.  Sources:  Washington Cathedral Greenhouse, Brooklyn Botanic Garden Record,Cooking with Herbs.
Suggested salad dressing herbs:  tarragon, basil, salad burnet (cucumber flavor), lemon balm, 
lovage (celery flavor), rosemary, dill, mint, garlic, and chives.

* Slowly heat one quart vinegar in enamel pan.  Do not boil. Set aside to cool
* Wash a handful of herb leaves & stems and dry carefully. If water is left on leaves, vinegar will
get cloudy.
* Add leaves to bottles and pour vinegar over herbs.
* Label & date.  
* In 4-6 weeks, strain vinegar and store in bottles.  (It sounds like they are suggesting you toss
the leaves before restoring. 

2.  Some of these tips are from Oregon State University Extension Service, Nellie Oehler

Use 3-4 sprigs of fresh herbs or 3 T dried herbs for each pint of vinegar.  The new leaves at the
tip of the plant usually are the most flavorful.

For best quality, use within 4 months.  We use ours up to a year later and they retain their flavor,
but they are more pungent.  

Substitute your favorite herbs.  Peppercorns and citrus slices or rind are optional.  For those of us
who don't have time to make their own white wine vinegar, use white distilled vinegar for a
pungent taste (good with dill) or cider vinegar for a more subtle taste (tarragon, thyme, sweet
marjoram, basil).  

This recipe is also good for storing chile peppers as you harvest them.   Add a clove of garlic and
a slice of lemon and you have a base for salad dressings and stir fries.  

2    basil sprigs (about 5" long)
2    oregano sprigs (about 5" long)
1    t whole black peppercorns (optional)
1    pt white wine, cider, or distilled white vinegar

1.   Sterilize jars by boiling for 10 minutes.  This inhibits microorganisms that cloud vinegar. 
2.   Insert herbs into jar.  Add vinegar.  Some prefer heating vinegar to just below boiling
     point before adding.
3.   Use plastic lids or cork to seal bottles.  (Metal jar tops will rust.)
4.   Let steep in cool, dark place for 3 weeks to develop flavor.
5.   After opening, store vinegar in cool, dark place.

          

3.  Herb Vinegar

Note:  For best quality, use within 4 months.  We use ours up to a year later and they retain their flavor, but
 they are slightly more pungent. Some of these tips are from Oregon State University Extension Service, Nellie 
Oehler.

3-4	sprigs of fresh herbs, or 3 T dried herbs, of choice 
1 pt vinegar (substitute white distilled vinegar for a pungent taste (good with dill) or cider vinegar for a more subtle 
taste (tarragon, thyme, sweet marjoram, basil)  

1.   Sterilize jars by boiling for 10 minutes.  This inhibits microorganisms that cloud vinegar. 
2.   Insert herbs into jar.  Add vinegar.  Some prefer heating vinegar to just below boiling point before adding.
3.   Use plastic lids or cork to seal bottles.  (Metal jar tops will rust.)
4.   Let steep in cool, dark place for 3 weeks to develop flavor.
5.   After opening, store vinegar in cool, dark place.

4.  Herb Oil

chosen herb(s), flowering if you wish
4     cloves garlic, peeled and bruised (opt)
16   oz olive oil
1    qt tasteless salad oil

1.   Do not wash herbs unless mud-splashed.  If you must wash them, be sure they are dry before you put them in the jar 
with the oil, otherwise it will become cloudy.
2.   Loosely pack into large jar with tight fitting lids.  Add garlic if using and pour mixture of olive and salad oil to 
cover herbs completely.
3.   Cover and leave in dark, cool place for at least a month, turning gently once in a while.
into clean, dry clear bottles with cork.