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Green Cleaning -- More Recipes

Another green living practice that reduces our dependency on petrochemicals:  make your own non- or less-toxic solvent.   Source:    North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service Bulletin,  North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 

All-Purpose Cleaner I
4 tablespoons baking soda
1 quart warm water
Dissolve baking soda in warm water. Apply with a sponge. Rinse with clear water.
All-Purpose Cleaner II
Apply baking soda to a damp sponge. Rinse with clear water.
All-Purpose Cleaner III
1 tablespoon ammonia
1 tablespoon liquid detergent
1 pint water (2 cups)
Mix ingredients and put in spray bottle. Spray on surface. Wipe. Rinse with 
clear water. Ammonia is a toxic ingredient. Handle it with care and store it 
safely.
Drain Cleaner
1/2 cup baking soda
1/2 cup white vinegar
Boiling water
Pour baking soda down the drain. Add white vinegar and cover the drain, if 
possible. Let set for 5 minutes. Then pour a kettle of boiling water down the 
drain. (The vinegar and baking soda break down fatty acids into soap and 
glycerine, allowing the clog to wash down the drain.) Do not use this method if 
you have used a commercial drain opener and it may still be present in the 
drain.
 
Drain Opener
Use a plunger (plumber's helper). It may take a number of plunges to unclog the 
drain. Do not use this method if you have used a commercial drain opener and it 
may still be present in the drain.
Drain Cleaner and Opener
Use a flexible metal snake. The mechanical snake may be purchased or rented. 
Thread it down the clogged drain, and you will be able to push the clog away.
Furniture Cleaner and Polish I
3 cups olive oil
1 cup vinegar
Mix together until well blended. Use a clean, soft cloth to apply to the 
furniture.
Furniture Cleaner and Polish II
Wet a washcloth. Wring out as much water as possible. Wipe furniture surface 
with damp washcloth. Dry immediately with a clean, soft, dry cloth. (You can 
remove sticky fingerprints and dust safely from wood surfaces, but furniture 
with an oil finish needs an oil-based cleaner.)
Lime and Mineral Deposit Remover
Soak paper towels in vinegar. Apply the paper towels to the lime deposits around 
the faucet. Leave them on for approximately one hour. The deposits will be 
softened and can be removed easily.

Aluminum Cleaner
2 tablespoons cream of tartar
1 quart water
To clean aluminum cookware, combine ingredients in cookware. Bring solution to a 
boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Wash and dry as usual.
Brass Cleaner
 
Lemon juice
Baking soda
Make a paste about the consistency of toothpaste. Rub onto brass with a soft 
cloth. Rinse with water and dry.
Brass Cleaner 2
Lemon juice
Cream of tartar
Make a paste about the consistency of toothpaste. Apply to surface, leave on for 
5 minutes. Wash with warm water. Dry with a soft cloth.
Chrome and Stainless Steel Cleaner
Dip soft cloth in undiluted white vinegar. Wipe surface.
Oven Cleaner
Baking soda
Very fine steel wool
Sprinkle water on oven surface. Apply baking soda. Rub using very fine steel 
wool. Wipe off scum with a damp sponge. Rinse well and dry.
Oven Cleaner 2
While oven is still warm, sprinkle water on the spill, then sprinkle salt on it. 
When the oven cools down, scrape the spill away and wash the area.
Toilet Bowl Cleaner 1
Borax
Lemon juice
Mix lemon juice and borax to make a paste about the consistency of toothpaste. 
Flush toilet to wet sides. Rub paste on toilet bowl ring. Let sit for 2 hours 
and then scrub thoroughly. Borax is a toxic ingredient. Handle it with care and 
store it safely.
Toilet Bowl Cleaner 2
Baking soda
Vinegar
Sprinkle baking soda into the toilet bowl. Add vinegar. Scour with a toilet 
brush.
Toilet Bowl Cleaner 3
Pour 1/2 cup liquid chlorine bleach into toilet bowl. Let stand for 30 to 45 
minutes. Scrub with a brush. Flush. Do not mix bleach with vinegar, toilet bowl 
cleaner, or ammonia. Chlorine bleach is a toxic ingredient. Handle it with care 
and store it safely.
For more information on hazardous products in the home, see Reducing Hazardous 
Products in Your Home, or Hazardous Household Products, or Disposal of Hazardous 
Household Wastes.
Prepared by Dr. Wilma Hammett, Extension Housing Specialist, North Carolina 
Cooperative Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C.
This publication has been issued in print by the North Carolina Cooperative 
Extension Service as a section of publication he-368-2 (January 1991).

Distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914. 
Employment and program opportunities are offered to all people regardless of 
race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. North Carolina State 
University, North Carolina A&T State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
and local governments cooperating.
Electronic Publication Number 
(June 1995--JMG)